Friday, March 27, 2015

Stanford Accepted 2144 Students for the Class of 2019

Stanford University has offered admission to 2,144 students, including 742 applicants who were accepted last December through the early action program, the Office of Undergraduate Admission and Financial Aid announced today.

In addition, Stanford announced that it is expanding financial aid by increasing the income thresholds at which parents are not expected to contribute toward educational costs.

Under the new policy, Stanford will expect no parental contribution toward tuition from parents with annual incomes below $125,000 – previously $100,000 – and typical assets. And there will be zero parental contribution toward tuition, room or board for parents with annual incomes below $65,000 – previously $60,000 – and typical assets.

"Our highest priority is that Stanford remain affordable and accessible to the most talented students, regardless of their financial circumstances," said Provost John Etchemendy. "Our generous financial aid program accomplishes that, and these enhancements will help even more families, including those in the middle class, afford Stanford without going into debt. Over half of our undergraduates receive financial aid from Stanford, and we are pleased that this program will make it even easier for students to thrive here."

Admits to Class of 2019
The Class of 2019 was selected from 42,487 candidates, the largest applicant pool in Stanford's history. The admitted students come from 50 states and 77 countries.

Of the admitted class, 16 percent are first-generation college students.

"We are honored by the interest in Stanford and the experiences shared by all prospective students through the application process," said Richard Shaw, dean of admission and financial aid. "The young people admitted to the Class of 2019 will engage their undergraduate years at Stanford with energy and initiative. Their contributions will impact the world in immeasurable ways. We are thrilled to communicate the good news to these accomplished students. The opportunities at Stanford are limitless, and our newly enhanced financial support makes these opportunities more accessible than ever before."

Students admitted under the early and regular decision admission program have until May 1 to accept Stanford's offer.

Expanded financial aid
Stanford has long been committed to need-blind admissions for U.S. students, supported by a financial aid program that meets the demonstrated financial need of all admitted undergraduate students.

Since 2008-09, Stanford has provided two simple benchmarks that make it easy for prospective students to understand the possibilities for getting financial support from Stanford. These two benchmarks are being updated for all undergraduates for the 2015-16 year, with no parental contribution toward tuition expected for those with annual incomes below $125,000 and typical assets, and no parental contribution toward tuition, room or board expected for those below $65,000 with typical assets. Scholarship or grant funds will be provided to cover these costs in lieu of a parental contribution.

In either case, students will still be expected to contribute toward their own educational expenses from summer income, savings and part-time work during the school year. Students are expected to contribute at least $5,000 per year from these sources but are not expected to borrow to make the contribution.

Currently, 77 percent of Stanford undergraduates leave the university at graduation with no student debt.

Families with incomes at higher levels, typically up to $225,000, may also qualify for financial assistance, especially if more than one family member is enrolled in college. Financial aid offers vary by family, but the financial aid expansion for 2015-16 will allow Stanford to reduce the expected parental contribution for many families at these higher income levels.

Annual costs for a typical Stanford student total roughly $65,000 before financial aid.

"This expansion of the financial aid program is a demonstration of Stanford's commitment to access for outstanding students from all backgrounds – including not only those from the lowest socioeconomic status, but also middle- and upper-middle-class families who need our assistance as well," said Karen Cooper, associate dean and director of financial aid.

MEDIA CONTACT
Richard H. Shaw, dean of admission and financial aid: (650) 723-2091, rhshaw@stanford.edu

http://news.stanford.edu/news/2015/march/new-admits-finaid-032715.html

Duke Accepted 3466 Students for Class of 2019

For the third consecutive year, Duke's regular decision acceptance rate is in the single digits—coming in at 9.4 percent for the Class of 2019.

At 7 p.m. today, the University released admissions decisions online to more than 28,000 applicants—and for 2,650 of them, the news was good. An additional 69 students who were deferred from the early decision process were accepted.
This year's acceptance rate is up slightly from last year's record low of 9 percent. The number of regular decision applications dipped slightly, from 29,300 last year to just more than 28,000 this year.
"Nationwide we’ve stopped seeing that sharp increase [in applications] that we saw from about 2008 to 2013 across the board. I think for most schools that has settled down," Dean of Undergraduate Admissions Christoph Guttentag said. "We never want to be static, we never want to rest on our laurels. We’re in that environment where smart and talented students are being recruited by a lot of wonderful universities. We are not going to take anything for granted.”
This year's early decision process admitted 815 students, filling a record 48 percent of the total class. The proportion of the class admitted early has steadily increased over the last decade—going from approximately 30 percent in the mid-2000s to nearly 50 percent today.

"We try to balance having a significant, meaningful group of students for whom Duke is a first choice with a significant presence of student who chose Duke after having had lots of options," Guttentag said. "I like the balance of where we are. I don’t expect that to change dramatically in the next few years. It does mean students who apply regular decision face a particularly selective process.”
The University tends to study the racial, ethnic and geographic diversity of the class after students enroll at Duke—rather than after they are admitted—but the Class of 2019 looks as if it will be "very similar" to last year's in terms of demographics, Guttentag said.
Students from all 50 states were accepted, with California, North Carolina, New York, Florida and Texas offering the most admits.
Regular decision students have until May 1 to make their final decision. Prospective students will be able to attend one of three Blue Devil Days sessions on campus throughout the month of April.

"Even with the challenges of all the construction, I think the students who are visiting for Blue Devil Days will see Duke not only as it is but as it will be once they arrive,” Guttentag said.
This article was updated at 11:11 p.m. Thursday.

http://www.dukechronicle.com/articles/2015/03/26/duke-admits-2650-regular-decision-applicants#.VRWGq_nF-So

Wednesday, March 18, 2015

Penn Sent out Approximately 400 Likely Letters

Not all regular decision Penn applicants must endure a three-month wait for their admissions decisions.

This year, Penn will send likely letters, which virtually guarantee admission, to approximately 400 applicants in total. About half of this group was notified on Feb. 12, and the other half will receive notifications early this month.

Likely letters provide outstanding applicants with additional time to consider their college options by offering a decision earlier than originally expected. However, they also aim to ensure that Penn snags more top students than its competitors for its incoming freshman class.

“They’re colleges basically showing their insecurity,” Brian Taylor, director of The Ivy Coach, a New York-based college consulting firm, said. “They want to get these students to attend their college over every other college because these students have options.”

Taylor believes that reaching out to applicants early is a very effective way to attract their attention. “When you hear from Penn very early that they love you, that’s very powerful,” he said.

Dean of Admissions Eric Furda said that the purpose of likely letters is to initiate early communication with some of the most desirable prospective students.

“We’re going to get a start on some students who are going to have a number of options,” he said.

Taylor added that likely letter recipients tend to have special qualities that will enhance the reputation of their chosen college, such as top-ranked athletic abilities or Intel Science Fair awards.

These applicants are “the kids who they can brag about,” Taylor said. “Those are the kids who get the likely letters, the kids who are exceptional.”

Veena McCoole, an applicant for the Class of 2019, received a likely letter in the first round of distribution. Although she has not officially decided to go to Penn, she said that receiving the message has made her more excited about possibly attending.

“It took me awhile to process it but obviously the congratulations in really big letters was hugely exciting,” McCoole said. “I was ecstatic.”

McCoole believes the likely letter succeeded in achieving its goal: convincing her early that Penn is a top option.

“It definitely worked in terms of getting me very psyched,” she said.

Although Furda is excited about the Office of Admissions' likely letter program, he mentioned that it often discourages students who did not receive likely letters.

“This is a tough message,” Furda said. “I need to let all the other students know that this is a small fraction of the overall admits, that they still have a chance.”

Applicants who did not receive likely letters can access their admissions decisions on March 31 at 5 p.m.

http://www.thedp.com/article/2015/03/likely-letters-aim-to-recruit-top-applicants

Saturday, March 14, 2015

MIT Accepted 1467 Students for the Class of 2019

18,306 students applied to the MIT Class of 2019. As of today, and inclusive of Early Action, we have offered admission to 1467.

These 1467 students are truly exceptional. The admitted Class of 2019 includes makers and marksmen, eidetics and entrepreneurs, Georgians (as in Atlanta) and Georgians (as in Tbilisi). Individually they represent 67 countries and more than 1000 high schools; together, they constitute an incredible community, each contributing a set of rare skills and perspectives while holding in common the highest caliber of character, conscientiousness, and, of course, remarkable intelligence.

We often say we don’t admit numbers to MIT, we admit people. Yet this isn’t quite true either: we admit classes, cohorts which have been curated with care, each contributor collected to create the best possible team to climb the mountain that is MIT.

There are also those students who may be climbing other mountains, with other people, next fall. Of the students to whom we do not offer admission today, we have placed a small number on our waitlist and informed the balance that we will not be able to admit them to the Class of 2019. Turning away so many kind, generous, super-smart students has been more than difficult: it has been truly painful.

If you are among them, then all I can say is that MIT is just another place. If it is amazing, it is amazing not because of some occult magick emanating from beneath the Great Dome, but because the people here are amazing. And if you are an amazing person, then you can be amazing wherever you go, if you choose to be.

I'm closing comments on this blog post to concentrate conversation in the open threads for admitted, waitlisted, and not admitted students.

Congratulations to the Class of 2019. I wish all of our applicants well. No matter where you enroll next fall, please make it a better place. I know you can. I hope you will.

http://mitadmissions.org/blogs/entry/mit-regular-action-decisions-now-available-online2

Thursday, March 5, 2015

Admit Rates for Class of 2017

School
Admit Rate
Stanford University
5.70%
Harvard University
5.80%
Columbia University
6.90%
Yale University
6.90%
Princeton University
7.40%
United States Naval Academy
7.40%
Cooper Union
7.70%
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
8.20%
University of Chicago
8.80%
United States Military Academy
9%
Brown University
9.20%
Alice Lloyd College
9.40%
Dartmouth College
10.40%
California Institute of Technology
10.60%
Claremont McKenna College
11.70%
College of the Ozarks
12.20%
University of Pennsylvania
12.20%
Duke University
12.40%
Vanderbilt University
12.70%
Pomona College
13.90%
Rust College
13.90%
Northwestern University
14%
Amherst College
14.30%
Swarthmore College
14.30%
Pitzer College
14.50%
Bowdoin College
15%
United States Air Force Academy
15.40%
Cornell University
15.60%
Washington University in St. Louis
15.60%
United States Coast Guard Academy
16.50%
Rice University
16.70%
Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering
16.80%
Georgetown University
17.10%
Johns Hopkins University
17.10%
Middlebury College
17.50%
Williams College
17.50%
University of California—​Berkeley
17.70%
United States Merchant Marine Academy
18.20%
Washington and Lee University
18.40%
Tufts University
18.90%
Harvey Mudd College
19.10%
University of Southern California
19.80%
University of California—​Los Angeles
20.40%
Wesleyan University
20.40%
Barnard College
20.50%
Carleton College
21%
Robert Morris University
21%
Fisk University
21.20%
Liberty University
21.20%
Missouri Valley College
22.20%
Colorado College
22.30%
University of Notre Dame
22.30%
Mississippi Valley State University
22.70%
Our Lady of the Lake University
22.70%
Haverford College
23.50%
Oklahoma Wesleyan University
23.90%
Albany State University
24%
Vassar College
24.10%
Bates College
24.20%
CUNY—​Lehman College
25.40%
Carnegie Mellon University
25.50%
Davidson College
25.60%
Colby College
26%
Tulane University
26.40%
CUNY—​Baruch College
26.50%
Emory University
26.50%
Colgate University
26.70%
University of North Carolina—​Chapel Hill
26.70%
Hamilton College
27.20%
Edward Waters College
27.30%
LeMoyne-​Owen College
27.40%
University of Arkansas—​Pine Bluff
27.70%
Babson College
28.20%
Chicago State University
28.70%
Northwest Nazarene University
29.10%
Wellesley College
29.10%
Spalding University
29.30%
Bucknell University
29.50%
Webb Institute
29.50%
Southwestern Assemblies of God University
29.90%
University of Virginia
30.10%
Oberlin College
30.40%
Lehigh University
30.80%
Fort Valley State University
30.90%
CUNY—​Hunter College
31%
University of Richmond
31.20%
Southwestern Adventist University
31.50%
Trinity College
31.80%
Boston College
32.20%
New Mexico Institute of Mining and Tech
32.20%
Northeastern University
32.30%
New York University
32.40%
Concordia College
32.6% 4
College of the Holy Cross
33%
College of William and Mary
33.20%
Purchase College—​SUNY
33.20%
Central State University
33.30%
University of Michigan—​Ann Arbor
33.30%
Lane College
33.40%


http://colleges.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-colleges/rankings/lowest-acceptance-rate/page+3

Sunday, February 22, 2015

Top 25 Scorers in 2015 AMC 10A

Rank
Score
First Initial
Last 
Name
Grade
Location
1
150
H
KIM
9
WYCKOFF, NJ
1
150
J
LEE
9
VA
1
150
S
NICE
9
ASH, AL
1
150
A
WHITE
10
OCONTO, WI
1
150
S
ZHU
10
ANDOVER, MA
6
145.5
S
DARD
10
ELM, GA
7
144
Z
LEE
9
PINEVILLE, NC
7
144
S
LIU
10
CHARLOTTE, NC
7
144
A
PENG
9
FENTON, MO
7
144
E
WAN
6
BELLEVUE, WA
7
144
A
YUE
10
ANDOVER, MA
12
141
S
NIU
10
CUPERTINO, CA
12
141
W
SUN
9
FALLS CHURCH, VA
12
141
A
WANG
8
SUGAR LAND, TX
15
139.5
J
HONG
10
PALO ALTO, CA
15
139.5
J
ZHOU
9
NJ
17
138
N
CHEERLA
10
CUPERTINO, CA
17
138
G
CUI
9
NORTH POTOMAC, MD
17
138
N
HU
8
WESTLAFAYETTE, IN
17
138
K
REBHOLZ
8
BERWYN, PA
17
138
M
REN
9
ANDOVER, MA
17
138
T
WANG
7
MARLBORO, NJ
17
138
D
ZHAO
10
DALLAS, TX
24
136.5
P
RATHORE
10
NORTHPOTOMAC, MD
24
136.5
D
SONG
10
RIDGEWOOD, NJ